Justine Grillet

Justine Grillet


16.10 - 13.11 Throughout my practice I’ve mostly been working around three topics: Theatre, Structure & Performance, explains my idea of working with different scenes from a play. To create a stage where figures can perform and dance. For this, I use theories from fictional stories that I consider as truth and applies them in my work. By playing with a non-physical world, I feel like I can question the role of a performer and the meaning of his performance. This means that creatures living in this particular world can be drawn, written down, or become a piece of sound. These non-physical creatures or monsters suggest figurative work. They do not exist in the real world but in words, memories, and stories, they are present. After this process some of them become physical beings and they’re growing into characters with a personality.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Charlot Van Geert

Charlot Van Geert

29.01.22 – 05.03.22 Van Geert kicks the shins of art history and all the obvious meanings in art and everyday life. But she does not do this lightly. She does not create chaos, but irony. Irony is a form of humor that creates expectations and then does not fulfill them, but breaks them down. There is a great complexity in the use of irony: a game with psychology, obviousness, timing, subtlety, that Van Geert plays throughout her oeuvre. What you (think you) see is never what you get.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Bram De Jonghe

Bram De Jonghe - All's well that ends well

12.03.22 - The works for the duo-exhibition “All’s well that ends well” are an accumulation of comments on my own practice and my role in society. The title is a proverb meaning : as long as the outcome is good, problems on the way don’t matter. On the one hand this can refer to the human cost. On the other hand relates to the way I work in the studio and has a more positive vision of the future. One work can transform into another and cease to exist. They enable me to look forward along with the work.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Dries Segers – The Bones

29.01 – 05.03

Dries Segers – The Bones

Dries Segers (°1990, Belgium) is a photographer, fabulator, storyteller, and plant bender. He works with various media and print techniques. His work is centered on photographic fabulation with a main focus on the non-human, Invisibles, and ecological meltdown. Segers works with the history of photography by activating the use of specific techniques and attitudes. This results in plant-based prints, camera-less photographs, and extreme close-up photography. His latest project Hotel Bellevue focuses on border trees and a Celtic use of a landscape.

 

The work of Dries Segers has been shown in many solo and group shows, including Vitrine Gallery (Basel, Switzerland), A Tale of A Tub (Rotterdam, Netherlands), The Weekend Room (Seoul, South Korea), De Brakke Grond (Amsterdam, Netherlands), Musee and Galerie Botanique (Brussels), Neue Galerie (Ausberg, Germany), Warte für Kunst (Kassel, Germany), 019 (Ghent), Art On Paper (Bozar, Brussels), Tique art space (Antwerp), De Warande (Turnhout) and Fotomuseum (Antwerp).

 

(b. 1990) lives and works in Brussels, Belgium




Veronika Pot

Veronika Pot

29.01.22 – 05.03.22 Veronika Pot's photographs always return to an analogous representation of nature. In her earlier series she often used a Camera Obscura to introduce an alienating character in her images. The blurred corners, sharp center and strong contrasts could almost be smartphone filters applied to her photos. Yet it is all carefully developed and printed in the darkroom.

In her latest series 'Before again.' Pot works in a similar way. The Camera Obscura has been replaced by a traditional analog camera, the images taken are fragmented. These fragments are brought together as a collage and photographed again. With this she will perform digital-looking actions in an analogous way, seemingly with the same result, without any form of Photoshop or digital manipulation. The final image is a digital archival print that only enhances the trompe l'oeil effect. The images come in as different photos that the viewer wants to experience together. The question arises as to what the original image was and how it was able to transform itself into an amalgam of simultaneous images.

Veronika Pot's process is about transforming images. Capturing moments to remember them again and processing them selectively and fragmentarily into new images. The original image has often become unrecognizable and raises the question of the context in which it originated. They are landscapes, trees, sea, rocks, ... that Pot tries to 're-view', 're-memorize' and 're-visualize' – often with references throughout the art history of landscape painting and land art.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Harold Lechien

Harold Lechien – Mark Brand

06.01 – 05.02 Mark Brand is a hybrid body of work associating an artistic production with a promotion exploiting the language of branding, then used as artistic material. The heart of the installa- tion is a video bringing together the artworks and a series of messages, logos and derived objects used in a narrative process that makes the brand oscillate between artistic discourse and a commercial product. It reveals an emotional relationship to these products, to their equivocal status in our lives, and to their distribution.

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

I’m Not In Love / Situation Still Standing

4.12.21—22.01.22

Simon Demeuter, Tamara Van San

I’m Not In Love/Situation Still Standing
Inspired by a trip to Rome, Simon Demeuter uses his imagination to bring the beautiful mosaic floors with stunned images of gladiators in the old Roman villas back to life in a colourful way. In an earlier series shown this year at L21 in Palma de Mallorca, Demeuter depicted with soft fresh colours - and with beautiful imagery - the meeting and physical discovery of different people. Like fighting gladiators, Demeuter's combatants feel each other out and a tension is built up between the depicted figures. The present series shown at Ballroom Gallery tells the continuation of this story. The colours become more intense, the intention of the figures turns clearer and the confrontation between the gladiators comes to a head. Powerful colours, simple but energetic poses, a (violent) climax and then a farewell and soft slips into solitude. Through his gladiators, Simon Demeuter portrays a metamorphosis of life, with a story of hope, excitement, love, loneliness and sensitivity. For Van San, all existing forms are three-dimensional, which means that she only constructs sculptures. Sculptures that consciously abandon the traditional ceramic technique. Forms that construct themselves and allow themselves to be translated into colourful glazes. The sculptures in the series shown by Van San in Ballroom Gallery refer to large amphorae that might have been found on the seabed during one of her diving trips in the Middle East. Old vases and jars that have been taken over by algae and corals and have acquired an enormous splendour of shapes and colours on top of their classical forms. By doing so, Van San offers the viewer a wide space to unleash their own imagination on the images. In this exhibition, the artists works are also presented in a less conventional way, giving them something unreal and allowing a very contemporary character. The duo exhibition of Simon Demeuter and Tamara Van San is inspired by influences of ancient civilisations, but at the same time brings them back to life in a very colourful way. In addition, the works of both artists are vivid symbols for life, in which each stage - physical or emotional - undergoes a miraculous evolution.

Xavier Duffaut

Xavier Duffaut

18.11—18.12.21​ A place where poetic encounters emerge through processes of infiltration and appropriation, creating a cosmos of fraud and aesthetic conviction. Conceived as a soft-chateau, the exhibition is crowded with opulent expressions of hygiene, mass manufacturing and enchantment. Duffaut’s work activates the carefree qualities of market coercion. It shapes and sculpts wasted perfections up until a point where constellations of clean bold colors emerge.

For his first solo exhibition, Xavier Duffaut brings into focus the elegantly banal that intrigues him so. The works intend to produce a collective atmosphere of non-difference, of non-heterotopia. They allow us to fall implicit, to fall into a trope, into a corporate business meeting, a collective therapy session for people with trust issues.

FOURT asks serious questions about the nature of ‘realness’. Its impossibility and absolute possibility. Liveliness beyond the boundaries of realness. Forms catapult through the space creating new levels of dysphoric sensation and general confusion. A sanitary extravaganza, an arena of branded monstrosities. It wonders what might have happened in the factories or in the mechanical fur or in Julia's bathroom?

This show has one mission. To do it well. And then, to head to the compost or the gutter.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Stijn Stevens

16.10—13.11.21

Stijn Stevens

°1992. Lives and works in Brussels.
Graduated in 2018 at LUCA School of Arts Brussels

"How does the combination of light, space and time relate to the static image?" Light is one of the main conditions of a painting, but at the same time it is one of the most common elements in our daily life. We surround ourselves by (artificial) light with the use of smartphones, laptops or lamps in the evening, when the natural light disappears behind the horizon. Our relationship to light therefore determines how we experience time, just like space or its absence. The distorted reflexivity in my work abstracts the real world, and so the world becomes part of the work. This means that the work is in a constant flux of movement throughout the day, giving meaning to the moment when the spectator reads the work. In this way, the element of time creeps into the work. But time and space are inherently linked to each other. That's why we have "Spacetime"

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00