Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms - The assistants choice

27.08.22 – 08.10.22

LUCKY CHARMS is the first edition of The Assistants Choice, curated by the assistants of Ballroom Gallery (Marie Colebunders), DMW Gallery (Mathias Verhoeven) and Base-Alpha Gallery (Yasmin Van der Rauwelaert). Each assistant was invited to make a selection of artists and bring them together into a group exhibition at Ballroom Gallery.

“A Lucky Charm is an object or person that is thought to bring good luck, also known as a talisman or an amulet. It has an empowering and symbolic meaning, a sacred and hopeful reminder that is very personal to its owner.”

LUCKY CHARMS is a group exhibition with Alice Vanderschoot, Arnaud Eubelen, Arthur Dufoor, Carole Mousset, Che Go Eun, Chloé Arrouy, Elena Minyeyevtseva, Gavin Vanaelst, Geran Knol, Manon van den Eeden, Nicolas Zanoni, Rūdolfs Štamers, Sigurrós G. Björnsdóttir and Tommy Smits.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Nadia Naveau

Nadia Naveau


23.04 - 18.06 In her studio, Nadia Naveau often collects and finds fragments, small items or parts of objects; elements of unfinished thoughts. She brings them together into three-dimensional collages. It is her way of thinking: with memory, association and play. Clay is her main material: she uses it to sketch ideas, which may or may not be given a more 'final' elaboration. She often plays with the perception of materials, something rarely really is what we think we see. In terms of content, Naveau finds crossovers between art historical influences and pop culture (she makes references to figures from Greek mythology, the Baroque and presentations in archaeological museums, but also to The Simpsons and Disney). Naveau distances herself from an academic method (the strictly defined sequence of ideas, drawn sketches and sculpted and glazed final results). The artist's liberation occurs at the breaking point of conformity and finding a method all of one’s own. During the creation process, the clay often takes the lead: the image itself will evoke certain associations or coincidences.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Denitsa Todorova

Denitsa Todorova


23.04 - 18.06 Denitsa Todorova works almost exclusively with graphite on paper. Her method could be called quasi-sculptural: after she has completely blackened the paper with graphite, she reveals a composition (usually based on a photo) by removing the graphite in very precisely defined places. The whole process is time-consuming, intensive and not all too different from a sculptor who distills a shape by cutting away marble or wood. Due to the high degree of abstraction, it is tempting to think that her images are created almost effortlessly, as a result of intuitive artistic gestures, but in reality, Todorova leaves relatively little to coincidence. In her abstract drawings Todorova strives for a certain isolation of the viewer – a reduction of sensory stimuli in favour of a pure confrontation with the imagination. She compares it to staring into the sun for too long: you see black and colourful spots, distortions; shapes and images become more difficult to distinguish in a kind of dizzying mirage.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Kaspar Dejong

Kaspar Dejong


23.04 - 18.06 In his exhibition “Reading between the lines” Dejong focuses on our direct surroundings during an average city stroll. Dejong’s work is in line with the semiotic tradition that revolves around the exploring and studying of signs and symbols as a significant part of communication. The traces of life that surround us in our daily habitat are telling us stories of something that once was or one day will become. By lifting mundane/trivial signals and situations out of their initial context, decomposing them and studying them, Dejong intends to raise questions around their original intent and our ways of living

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Justine Grillet

Justine Grillet


16.10 - 13.11 Throughout my practice I’ve mostly been working around three topics: Theatre, Structure & Performance, explains my idea of working with different scenes from a play. To create a stage where figures can perform and dance. For this, I use theories from fictional stories that I consider as truth and applies them in my work. By playing with a non-physical world, I feel like I can question the role of a performer and the meaning of his performance. This means that creatures living in this particular world can be drawn, written down, or become a piece of sound. These non-physical creatures or monsters suggest figurative work. They do not exist in the real world but in words, memories, and stories, they are present. After this process some of them become physical beings and they’re growing into characters with a personality.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Charlot Van Geert

Charlot Van Geert

29.01.22 – 05.03.22 Van Geert kicks the shins of art history and all the obvious meanings in art and everyday life. But she does not do this lightly. She does not create chaos, but irony. Irony is a form of humor that creates expectations and then does not fulfill them, but breaks them down. There is a great complexity in the use of irony: a game with psychology, obviousness, timing, subtlety, that Van Geert plays throughout her oeuvre. What you (think you) see is never what you get.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Bram De Jonghe

Bram De Jonghe - All's well that ends well

12.03.22 - The works for the duo-exhibition “All’s well that ends well” are an accumulation of comments on my own practice and my role in society. The title is a proverb meaning : as long as the outcome is good, problems on the way don’t matter. On the one hand this can refer to the human cost. On the other hand relates to the way I work in the studio and has a more positive vision of the future. One work can transform into another and cease to exist. They enable me to look forward along with the work.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Dries Segers – The Bones

29.01 – 05.03

Dries Segers – The Bones

Dries Segers (°1990, Belgium) is a photographer, fabulator, storyteller, and plant bender. He works with various media and print techniques. His work is centered on photographic fabulation with a main focus on the non-human, Invisibles, and ecological meltdown. Segers works with the history of photography by activating the use of specific techniques and attitudes. This results in plant-based prints, camera-less photographs, and extreme close-up photography. His latest project Hotel Bellevue focuses on border trees and a Celtic use of a landscape.

 

The work of Dries Segers has been shown in many solo and group shows, including Vitrine Gallery (Basel, Switzerland), A Tale of A Tub (Rotterdam, Netherlands), The Weekend Room (Seoul, South Korea), De Brakke Grond (Amsterdam, Netherlands), Musee and Galerie Botanique (Brussels), Neue Galerie (Ausberg, Germany), Warte für Kunst (Kassel, Germany), 019 (Ghent), Art On Paper (Bozar, Brussels), Tique art space (Antwerp), De Warande (Turnhout) and Fotomuseum (Antwerp).

 

(b. 1990) lives and works in Brussels, Belgium




Veronika Pot

Veronika Pot

29.01.22 – 05.03.22 Veronika Pot's photographs always return to an analogous representation of nature. In her earlier series she often used a Camera Obscura to introduce an alienating character in her images. The blurred corners, sharp center and strong contrasts could almost be smartphone filters applied to her photos. Yet it is all carefully developed and printed in the darkroom.

In her latest series 'Before again.' Pot works in a similar way. The Camera Obscura has been replaced by a traditional analog camera, the images taken are fragmented. These fragments are brought together as a collage and photographed again. With this she will perform digital-looking actions in an analogous way, seemingly with the same result, without any form of Photoshop or digital manipulation. The final image is a digital archival print that only enhances the trompe l'oeil effect. The images come in as different photos that the viewer wants to experience together. The question arises as to what the original image was and how it was able to transform itself into an amalgam of simultaneous images.

Veronika Pot's process is about transforming images. Capturing moments to remember them again and processing them selectively and fragmentarily into new images. The original image has often become unrecognizable and raises the question of the context in which it originated. They are landscapes, trees, sea, rocks, ... that Pot tries to 're-view', 're-memorize' and 're-visualize' – often with references throughout the art history of landscape painting and land art.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00