Nadia Naveau

Nadia Naveau


23.04 - 18.06 In her studio, Nadia Naveau often collects and finds fragments, small items or parts of objects; elements of unfinished thoughts. She brings them together into three-dimensional collages. It is her way of thinking: with memory, association and play. Clay is her main material: she uses it to sketch ideas, which may or may not be given a more 'final' elaboration. She often plays with the perception of materials, something rarely really is what we think we see. In terms of content, Naveau finds crossovers between art historical influences and pop culture (she makes references to figures from Greek mythology, the Baroque and presentations in archaeological museums, but also to The Simpsons and Disney). Naveau distances herself from an academic method (the strictly defined sequence of ideas, drawn sketches and sculpted and glazed final results). The artist's liberation occurs at the breaking point of conformity and finding a method all of one’s own. During the creation process, the clay often takes the lead: the image itself will evoke certain associations or coincidences.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Veronika Pot

Veronika Pot

29.01.22 – 05.03.22 Veronika Pot's photographs always return to an analogous representation of nature. In her earlier series she often used a Camera Obscura to introduce an alienating character in her images. The blurred corners, sharp center and strong contrasts could almost be smartphone filters applied to her photos. Yet it is all carefully developed and printed in the darkroom.

In her latest series 'Before again.' Pot works in a similar way. The Camera Obscura has been replaced by a traditional analog camera, the images taken are fragmented. These fragments are brought together as a collage and photographed again. With this she will perform digital-looking actions in an analogous way, seemingly with the same result, without any form of Photoshop or digital manipulation. The final image is a digital archival print that only enhances the trompe l'oeil effect. The images come in as different photos that the viewer wants to experience together. The question arises as to what the original image was and how it was able to transform itself into an amalgam of simultaneous images.

Veronika Pot's process is about transforming images. Capturing moments to remember them again and processing them selectively and fragmentarily into new images. The original image has often become unrecognizable and raises the question of the context in which it originated. They are landscapes, trees, sea, rocks, ... that Pot tries to 're-view', 're-memorize' and 're-visualize' – often with references throughout the art history of landscape painting and land art.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Nadia Naveau

Nadia Naveau

°1975, Brugge. Lives and works in Antwerp and Saint-Bonnet-Tronçais

In her sculptures and installations, Nadia Naveau lets personal and collective memories interact in a game of images, symbols, texture, colour, scale, and presentation. Her resulting works appear as aggregations of matter and references – playing with the absurd, the figurative and the abstract; and this is also true for her oeuvre as a whole. She engages in a continuous game with her own creations, revisiting them, or fragments of them, in different constellations. Every exhibition is a new game, permitting the viewer to see her works in a new light. Her practice forms a pictorial puzzle, a fresh visual experience building on personal and collective associations, from then and now.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Lieven Segers

Lieven Segers

°1975, Geel. Lives and works in Antwerp

Lieven Segers typically seeks out situations or concepts where part of the outcome is left to coincidence, or to the interventions of others. In many ways his drawings, publications, editions, sculptures, installations, and actions challenge the conventions of the (commercial) art world. His work is ephemeral, coincidental, collaborative. The idea of creating a momentum, making something happen, sharing an experience is what drives his art. The spontaneous and serendipitous nature of his practice is an homage to our shared daily banalities; to the small, seemingly insignificant incidents and encounters that, however, can carry much meaning and beauty in the course of a lifetime.

Works

Geoffrey de Beer

Geoffrey de Beer

°1978. Lives and works in Antwerp and La Roche Morey

Geoffrey de Beer’s work is generally conceptual and political. His quasi-scientific methodology of strictly dispassionate experimentation and reporting is firmly situated within an institutional context and heavily extended into an institutional critique. However, his latest series he breaks with previous conceptual and performance-based artistic strategies and treads radically new territory. The entirely new series of works is inspired by the colorful architecture of small French Alsatian villages, the "golden ratio" of traditional painting composition, the form and color theory of the Bauhaus, poetry and the quest for aesthetic excellence.

Works

Denie Put

Denie Put

°1991. Lives and works in Antwerp

Denie Put describes his own paintings as ‘labyrinths of layers’. Most of his paintings show an underlying relief or texture, created by many layers of previous attempts and experiments on the canvas. He is guided by a variety of materials, ranging from oil paint, ink and acrylic to ballpoint pen, pencils, and paint rollers. Recurring elements resembling stone, wooden or metal structures bring a sculptural character to the paintings. Throughout a plethora of influences, ranging from Dalí and Ernst to Léger, Denie creates a unique and contemporary visual language. He is always looking to discover what paint can mean, on the canvas, as well as beyond it: for example, by experimenting with painted bell jars, or by adding a mural in the exhibition space.

Works

Denie Put

°1991. Lives and works in Antwerp

Denie Put describes his own paintings as ‘labyrinths of layers’. Most of his paintings show an underlying relief or texture, created by many layers of previous attempts and experiments on the canvas. He is guided by a variety of materials, ranging from oil paint, ink and acrylic to ballpoint pen, pencils, and paint rollers. Recurring elements resembling stone, wooden or metal structures bring a sculptural character to the paintings. Throughout a plethora of influences, ranging from Dalí and Ernst to Léger, Denie creates a unique and contemporary visual language. He is always looking to discover what paint can mean, on the canvas, as well as beyond it: for example, by experimenting with painted bell jars, or by adding a mural in the exhibition space.

Works

Yorgos Maraziotis

Yorgos Maraziotis

°1984, Athens. Lives and works in Antwerp and Patras

The multidisciplinary practice of Yorgos Maraziotis focuses on conceptual processes that translate one visual language to another by using mediums such as dialogue, oral histories and common materials of the plastic arts. He sculpturally intervenes in space and develops intimate participatory situations that question domesticity, contemporary habitation and the contrast between the pragmatic and the fictitious. Viewers of his works become active participants and are asked to think somatically. His artworks often gain a sensorial narrative, explore the ways our bodies relate to their surroundings, and attempt to co-exist strong antithetical notions, such as rawness/fragility, pleasure/ discontent, danger/safety

Works

Katleen Vinck

Katleen Vinck

°1976, lives and works in Antwerp

The starting point for Katleen Vinck’s sculptural work is her extreme fascination for architecture. Its foundations are often the last, imperishable remainders of long-lost civilizations. What Vinck desires to show is not the loss, but the beauty of what is temporary. Her work is futuristic rather than post-apocalyptic. Everything transforms into something new overtime, carrying layers of past lives. Her sculptures are rarely finished constructions or singular monuments, but rather appeal to that translucid, ungraspable moment of transformation. She works with the essence of archetypical architectural elements, functioning as residues and new beginnings all at once.

Works

Suse Weber

Suse Weber

°1972, lives and works in Berlin

Suse Weber works with sculpture, sound, installation, theatre and performance. Her works are permeated with emblems and symmetry. They reflect on everyday forms of society and socialisation. On the one hand, they present a cultural critique of social equality in certain areas. On the other hand, they pose questions that emphasise the sense of belonging, identity and self-image.
Suse Weber combines industrially produced raw material and self-made materials. The resulting aesthetic represents industrial mass production.

Works