Joris Vanpoucke

Joris Vanpoucke

°1983, lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium

Through various landscapes, distorted by dreamlike visions of flowers and other realistically drawn flora, Vanpoucke exhibits a world inspired by memories and existential questions, rather than by a visible reality. Like the many walks the artist takes around his studio during sunset or sunrise, Vanpoucke’s paintings appear ever to shimmer between night and day, between being awake and asleep, and between the dream and the mundane. What is real can no longer be ascertained. Surroundings become contexts and the landscape becomes the territory of the mind. Even though, in appearance, Vanpoucke’s paintings seem highly different from his drawings, they both possess a strong sense for modern-day Romanticism. Both are equally vulnerable and demonstrate the artist’s constant sensibilities; melancholic, nostalgic, utopian, and rich with a classical notion of the sublime. Made with great attention to both the art of drawing and painting, Vanpoucke’s works are simultaneously outspoken and quiet, daring to release a sigh when everything around it seems to scream. As such, Vanpoucke presents a sense of wonder not often seen in current times, finding stillness and beauty precisely where others do not, and making his works perhaps all the more welcome because of it. Vanpoucke’s works have been exhibited, among others, at Art on Paper (Bozar, Brussels), Gerhard Hofland (Amsterdam), DMW Gallery (Antwerp) and D’apostrof (Meigem).

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Denitsa Todorova

Denitsa Todorova

°1984, lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium

The evocative drawings of Denitsa Todorova give an impression of dual meanings, of splendour and peacefulness, while at the same time capturing an unspecified enigma. They are created through a unique process in which she covers the entire surface of the thin paper with a layer of graphite in order to take it off again, thereby revealing the composition in different layers. This meticulous technique draws from sgraffito, a practice commonly known in Eastern Europe, where the roots of the artist lay, but also bears similarities to the process of painting, revealing the artist’s training. Denitsa has exhibited at numerous art fairs and galleries throughout Europe, including Art Rotterdam (2020, 2018), Art on Paper (Brussels, 2019) and the STRABAG Art Foundation (Vienna, 2017). Her work has been recognized with various prizes, including the Recognition Award from STRABAG Art Award International (2017) and the Drawing Prize Ronse (2014 and 2015). She has also been nominated for multiple awards and honours, including the FID drawing prize Paris (2017) and the Art Contest 2016.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Nadia Naveau

Nadia Naveau

°1975, Brugge. Lives and works in Antwerp and Saint-Bonnet-Tronçais

In her sculptures and installations, Nadia Naveau lets personal and collective memories interact in a game of images, symbols, texture, colour, scale, and presentation. Her resulting works appear as aggregations of matter and references – playing with the absurd, the figurative and the abstract; and this is also true for her oeuvre as a whole. She engages in a continuous game with her own creations, revisiting them, or fragments of them, in different constellations. Every exhibition is a new game, permitting the viewer to see her works in a new light. Her practice forms a pictorial puzzle, a fresh visual experience building on personal and collective associations, from then and now.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Lieven Segers

Lieven Segers

°1975, Geel. Lives and works in Antwerp

Lieven Segers typically seeks out situations or concepts where part of the outcome is left to coincidence, or to the interventions of others. In many ways his drawings, publications, editions, sculptures, installations, and actions challenge the conventions of the (commercial) art world. His work is ephemeral, coincidental, collaborative. The idea of creating a momentum, making something happen, sharing an experience is what drives his art. The spontaneous and serendipitous nature of his practice is an homage to our shared daily banalities; to the small, seemingly insignificant incidents and encounters that, however, can carry much meaning and beauty in the course of a lifetime.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Geoffrey de Beer

Geoffrey de Beer

°1978. Lives and works in Antwerp and La Roche Morey

Geoffrey de Beer’s work is generally conceptual and political. His quasi-scientific methodology of strictly dispassionate experimentation and reporting is firmly situated within an institutional context and heavily extended into an institutional critique. However, his latest series he breaks with previous conceptual and performance-based artistic strategies and treads radically new territory. The entirely new series of works is inspired by the colorful architecture of small French Alsatian villages, the "golden ratio" of traditional painting composition, the form and color theory of the Bauhaus, poetry and the quest for aesthetic excellence.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Ellen Pil

Ellen Pil

°1982, lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium.

Ellen Pil is fascinated by the position of man in times of far-reaching digitization, robotization and mass production. Humanity reproduces, manipulates and perfects in its quest for an ideal. Astonished by the possibilities we have created for ourselves to bend reality to our will, Pil wonders what the story of man still is in it and what place the individual has. In her artistic process she uses partly the same tools and strategies as professional image builders. From a digital archive and using graphic programs, she explores different scenarios by continuously sketching, adjusting, cutting and polishing shapes and images, as if in a digital setting that can be endlessly reconfigured. From that digital studio, some images make the leap to a — much slower and more thoughtful — analog process, where they are applied to canvas in layers of acrylic and airbrush paint. For Pil, the digital and analog process merge seamlessly, no matter how different they are. Her painted works clearly show their digital roots. The chosen materials and colors, the interaction between 2D and 3D, the gradients and shadows give a mechanical impression, as if a machine was involved. (Text by Tim Vanheers)

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Denie Put

Denie Put

°1991. Lives and works in Antwerp

Denie Put describes his own paintings as ‘labyrinths of layers’. Most of his paintings show an underlying relief or texture, created by many layers of previous attempts and experiments on the canvas. He is guided by a variety of materials, ranging from oil paint, ink and acrylic to ballpoint pen, pencils, and paint rollers. Recurring elements resembling stone, wooden or metal structures bring a sculptural character to the paintings. Throughout a plethora of influences, ranging from Dalí and Ernst to Léger, Denie creates a unique and contemporary visual language. He is always looking to discover what paint can mean, on the canvas, as well as beyond it: for example, by experimenting with painted bell jars, or by adding a mural in the exhibition space.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Yorgos Maraziotis

Yorgos Maraziotis

°1984, Athens. Lives and works in Antwerp and Patras

The multidisciplinary practice of Yorgos Maraziotis focuses on conceptual processes that translate one visual language to another by using mediums such as dialogue, oral histories and common materials of the plastic arts. He sculpturally intervenes in space and develops intimate participatory situations that question domesticity, contemporary habitation and the contrast between the pragmatic and the fictitious. Viewers of his works become active participants and are asked to think somatically. His artworks often gain a sensorial narrative, explore the ways our bodies relate to their surroundings, and attempt to co-exist strong antithetical notions, such as rawness/fragility, pleasure/ discontent, danger/safety

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Michèle Matyn

Michèle Matyn

°1978, lives and works in Antwerp.

Michèle Matyn is originally a photography artist, who has since the start of her career relentlessly tried to break the boundaries of the medium. With her oeuvre spanning such a wide spectrum of materials, from photography to performance and from sculpture to film, she creates universes, rather than singular artworks. Aware of her performing body, she uses it directly to convey performative narratives. Her oeuvre is essentially built around human religious or mythical beliefs founded on an intuitive bond with nature. An exchange, an interaction, a crossroads where people and nature meet: this is at the heart of Matyn’s oeuvre and mind. Informed by myths, folklore, and stories passed on by rituals and oral or visual communication, she creates new ritual performances, radiating a new kind of magical connection, and opening up questions of relations between humans and nature – and of humans between themselves.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00

Katleen Vinck

Katleen Vinck

°1976, lives and works in Antwerp

The starting point for Katleen Vinck’s sculptural work is her extreme fascination for architecture. Its foundations are often the last, imperishable remainders of long-lost civilizations. What Vinck desires to show is not the loss, but the beauty of what is temporary. Her work is futuristic rather than post-apocalyptic. Everything transforms into something new overtime, carrying layers of past lives. Her sculptures are rarely finished constructions or singular monuments, but rather appeal to that translucid, ungraspable moment of transformation. She works with the essence of archetypical architectural elements, functioning as residues and new beginnings all at once.

Works

Ballroom Gallery
Koningsstraat 119–123
Rue Royale 1000 Brussels

Opening Hours
Wednesday — Saturday
12:00—18:00