Full of whispers

Full of whispers

04.02 - 18.03.23

I spend many parts of my childhood in ruins, prehistoric caves, dying cathedrals, archaeological sites and gravel pits. In the wake of destruction, I learned how time sculpts every stone carefully and precisely. A Greek column would shape shift to become an autonomous sculpture. A demonstration of Nature always having the upper hand. A ruin embodies paradoxes; a ruin is a remnant ‘off’ and a portal ‘in’. It’s a constant reminder of the passing of time. In melancholic fashion we reminisce about time before mass media.

Works

Ballroom Blitz

Ballroom Blitz

04.02 - 18.03.23

Painting has always been the starting point of Hilde Overbergh’s artistic practice. Not the kind of painting where the action takes place within the surface of a defined canvas, but a kind of painting that challenges and shifts the rules and notions of genres and media. Her artistic method is not focussed on claiming a certain signature style, it rather zooms in on the exploration of the transformative possibilities of materials, colors, and shapes. Her work comprises aspects of painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video, assemblage, and installation. And above anything else, the artist focuses on the process.
Although Overbergh approaches her work conceptually, what stands out is a great sense of intuition and tactility. Through leaving space for what’s unintentional or unforeseen during the creative process, her art never becomes sterile. The artist uses material to question herself. She reclaims insignificant, everyday objects – materials without obvious art-historical associations, or seemingly futile remnants of the past – and unravels and reshapes them into evocative carriers of meaning. She extracts beauty and poetry from humble materials such as foam, plastic waste, pieces of textile, glass shards … Her diverse oeuvre is also capable of holding on to elements of when and where the work was made. Environment and context often have a tangible influence on her artistic output through her search for a connection with social and urban dynamics.
By repeating and reworking fragments and works from previous presentations, the artist allows for not only the shape, but also the meaning of her work to stray and change. The meaning of her works accumulates over time, and changes according to their position in space or relation to context. Hilde Overbergh creates dynamic connections and associations between works of art and different presentations, which makes viewers sensitive to perception and experience. Her work exists fully in the present moment, and reflects the commotion and fragility of the world around us.

Works

Note to self

Note to self

23.04 - 04.06.22​

In the very free and fluid symbiosis between Todorova's drawings and Naveau's sculptures, both artists find an interesting look at their own work; a new layer of perception and meaning; a mental note. The joint exhibition Note to Self highlights points of contact between the artists (such as the sculptural potential of drawing and the sketchiness of clay) and allows the works, in their total freedom, to complement each other. This text can merely be an attempt to put into words why both oeuvres function so well together aesthetically. Their connection does not arise on an academic or rational level, but in an intuitive, emotional togetherness. Their mutual conversation is reflected in the unique, demarcated space of the gallery and reveals reverberating echoes. In this aesthetic echo, new openings arise to the imagination of the viewer and possibly also of the artists themselves.

Works

Imaginairy Mountains;Remembering Painting

Imaginary Mountains ; Remembering Painting

04.12.22 - 28.01.23

Having been first shown at an exhibition space in the Swiss alpine canton of Grisons “Ballroom Project” is pleased to present the exhibition «Imaginary Mountains: Remembering Painting» in Brussels. As a collaboration between an artists’ run space in an old textile factory in a small village (“Scala Trun”) and “Ballroom Project”, the exhibition aims to play with the exploration of painterly strategies in different contexts. What works in a village in the mountains also works in one of the busiest cities in Europe? How does the architectural, natural, cultural, and political circumstance influence the perception of artworks?
Painting, the supposed «epitome of bourgeois art», still inspires and fascinates the audiences. As the most flexible, changeable, authentic, and democratic medium, painting in keeping the artistic discourse alive. Often ridiculed by art critics in the current digitalization hype (keyword: NFT), it remains the dominant medium and does not seem to be disappearing. On the contrary: the always lively and controversial debates about its raison d'être keep the medium alive and the art world discussing.
Directly or indirectly, the international artists in this exhibition explore the painterly process one way or the other - sometimes with paint on canvas, but also with glass, wood, acid and other painterly means. They are well aware of their dialectical position on painting. Gianin Conrad (CH), Geoffrey de Beer (BE), Kaspar Dejong (NL), Mariejon de Jong-Buijs (NL) and Beate Frommelt (FL) deal with the medium in very different ways, but abstract all together. Abstraction as the universal creative language? It is obvious that self-reflection is part of their creative process.

Works

Unmatched

Unmatched

15.10 - 26.11.22

"unmatched"is an exhibition of Banjamin Volckaerts, it is a story about an unexpected event in a village far away from what is known to mankind.

Since last summer the village has been plagued by an enormous monster that lives in the shadows. After sunset, no one even dares to look outside, let alone step a foot into the darkness Since no bodies were ever found, there were whispers about the monster that it did not only kill but also devoured its victims. The village trembled in fear.

5 of the bravest warriors of the village were summoned to find and slaughter the mysterious creature.

The upcoming fortnight would serve as the ideal moment to execute the beast and free the village from these tortuous events. The warriors prepared themselves for the worst.

The day of doom came sooner than expected. At dusk, all the villagers began to hide in their homes as pure evil lurked around the corner. The warriors assembled in the main square of the city and braced themselves for battle. Unfortunately, they discovered that all their preparations were in vain.

The warriors launched attack after attack after attack but the monster did not even seem to blink

They fought with all of their strength, but alas. Wounded, exhausted and hopeless, they realized the beast’s strength was not even waning and that they couldn’t instill the slightest bit of fear into the ruthless savage.
So they ran.
And kept running, for their lives.
They tried to outrun from the monster but what they encountered afterwards was even more disastrous.

Sometimes you are afraid of something, simply because the thought of it has already become an invincible monster in your own mind.

Works

Lucky Charms

Lucky Charms - The assistants choice

27.08 – 08.10.22

LUCKY CHARMS is the first edition of The Assistants Choice, curated by the assistants of Ballroom Gallery (Marie Colebunders), DMW Gallery (Mathias Verhoeven) and Base-Alpha Gallery (Yasmin Van der Rauwelaert). Each assistant was invited to make a selection of artists and bring them together into a group exhibition at Ballroom Gallery.

“A Lucky Charm is an object or person that is thought to bring good luck, also known as a talisman or an amulet. It has an empowering and symbolic meaning, a sacred and hopeful reminder that is very personal to its owner.”

LUCKY CHARMS is a group exhibition with Alice Vanderschoot, Arnaud Eubelen, Arthur Dufoor, Carole Mousset, Che Go Eun, Chloé Arrouy, Elena Minyeyevtseva, Gavin Vanaelst, Geran Knol, Manon van den Eeden, Nicolas Zanoni, Rūdolfs Štamers, Sigurrós G. Björnsdóttir and Tommy Smits.

Works

Reading between the lines

Reading between the lines

23.04 - 04.06.22​

“Reading between the lines” Kaspar Dejong focuses on our direct surroundings during an average city stroll. Dejong’s work is in line with the semiotic tradition that revolves around the exploring and studying of signs and symbols as a significant part of communication. The traces of life that surround us in our daily habitat are telling us stories of something that once was or one day will become. By lifting mundane/trivial signals and situations out of their initial context, decomposing them and studying them, Dejong intends to raise questions around their original intent and our ways of living​

Works

Puppet factory

Puppet factory

17.03 – 16.04.22

Throughout my practice I’ve mostly been working around three topics: Theatre, Structure & Performance, explains my idea of working with different scenes from a play. To create a stage where figures can perform and dance. For this, I use theories from fictional stories that I consider as truth and applies them in my work. By playing with a non-physical world, I feel like I can question the role of a performer and the meaning of his performance. This means that creatures living in this particular world can be drawn, written down, or become a piece of sound. These non-physical creatures or monsters suggest figurative work. They do not exist in the real world but in words, memories, and stories, they are present. After this process some of them become physical beings and they’re growing into characters with a personality.

The relationship between sound and object. This has been one of my main concerns in the last years. They can be compared to an archaeological sound archive. I record all sorts of sounds in my atelier, from ceramic rattles to banging metal. My way of working with sound is an experimental and spontaneous process. I combine the sound of handcrafted objects with the sound of electronic devices such as a synthesizer and this by implementing the device in a sculpture. It’s essential for me to see how the elements work together and how they function as an arrangement.

‘In ‘The Book of Imaginary Beings’, Borges comments on all kinds of mythical creatures in a sly and humorous way. It is full of abstruse references and lots of fun. Something I want to keep in mind during my process. These stories can lead me to create my own creatures. According to this, drawings are and will remain an important element in my play. First of all, they are a way of thinking and processing. In addition to that, they can also be used as a tool to create a story, context or a landscape.

Works

Good luck

Good luck

29.01 – 05.03.22

What you see is not what you get Charlot Van Geert turns things upside down, figuratively speaking. She shakes up our unshakeable faith in objects and matter. By stripping objects of their seemingly obvious meaning, she creates new contexts, humorous situations and critical reflections on the objects and art with which we surround ourselves.

As a sculptor, she deals subversively with the materials traditionally given to her. In doing so, she not only challenges their reality, but also her own role as an artist. From working with less 'high' materials such as cardboard, polystyrene foam or PU foam, to the connection between the 'correct' material and the 'appropriate' look (bronze water levels, polystyrene foam lamps): Van Geert likes to put us on the wrong track.

She plays a game with design and the functions of objects: is it a utilitarian object or is it art? If a candlestick is art, can you burn a candle in it? As soon as that question arises, it also deals with the sacredness of art: does something still have artistic value when it can be manipulated, can get dirty, can fall down? There is no need to fear fingerprints: those of the artist are often present, also in bronze reliefs, in which the traces of the kneaded wax model are still clearly visible. It is as if Van Geert is deliberately wiping her proverbial feet of the high status of art - also literally, with her bronze doormat or six-pack can holder, and by elevating other everyday objects to artistic heights. By doing so, she also takes them out of their comfort zone: her idiosyncratic techniques, for example, destroy the apparent, proud inviolability of bronze.

Works